Create your own Web site

A recent survey shows that only 36 percent of businesses employing up to 100 people have a Web site. The other two-thirds should have one. A presence on the Web provides information about the business to prospective customers, suppliers and employees. Even a little information about the business is better than being nonexistent on the Web.

Today you can set up a site without technical help or Web hosting costs.

First: Buy a domain name (like yourcompany.com). To do it, visit any of the thousands of online registrars such as godaddy.com, aplus.net, networksolutions. com. Search for the domain name you want. If it’s already taken, type in another, then click “Proceed to Checkout.” The cost ranges from $6 to $10 a year to secure a domain.

Second: Find a place to host your site. Several companies now provide Web hosting services free of charge. Visit sites such as Microsoft’s weebly. com or synthasite.com. You can also buy your domains at these sites. Like all the ‘build it online’ services, you don’t need any technical knowledge at all to build an attractive Web site.

Third: Set up your site. A basic site includes a welcoming home page, a page that describes your business, and a contact page that tells how to reach you.

You can add to the pages by typing in text or dragging and dropping graphics. One free and easy way to improve your design is to use HTML coding, but you don’t have to know the codes, says

The Wall Street Journal. Many sites offer handy blocks of html that you can plug into your site as easily as copying and pasting text.

elearning 101 web links for July 11, 2008

The Best Online Learning Games — 2008

“It’s quite a diverse collection. So if you have your student participate in the voting they might, or might not, want to try out all of them. Less than a handful require registration, but those that do make it very easy.”


The magic of online learning boosts kids’ reading & writing

“Several children, some of whom couldn’t sit still, became engaged in Abracadabra’s educational gaming format. It offers surprises, competition and rewards, without comparing one student to another. One boy in particular, who struggled with simple letter identification, was absolutely engrossed,” Dr Lea said.

Report Reveals Growing Momentum in Online Learning
“Over 26% of teachers in 2007 chose online learning as their preferred methodology for their own professional development, compared to 7% in 2006.”

GetEducated.com Online Education Survey Ranks Top Best Consumer Buys in Online Engineering Graduate Schools and Master Degrees

“The online education survey ranks and recommends 28 engineering schools as Consumer Best Buy Online Universities, offering brand name graduate degrees online to consumers at tuition costs well below the national average.”

elearning 101 web links for June 27, 2008

U.S. Department of Education Releases Report on the Status of online learning.

“Education in this country has evolved dramatically from the days of one teacher in a one-room schoolhouse. Today, student learning is no longer confined to a physical space. Computers and the Internet have broken through school walls, giving students greater opportunities to personalize their education, access distant resources, receive extra help or more-challenging assignments, and engage in learning in new and unique ways.”

Personal Learning Determines Success

According to education experts, personal learning in distance learning programs plays the most important role in the success of ones completion. “The students decide on their own success”, said Dr. Ralf Andreas Thoma, head of studies Betriebwirtschaftliches Institut & Seminar Basel AG / Switzerland.

Online classes reshape schooling

“Enrollment on rise as high schoolers enroll in AP courses”

Online learning can help minority students

“As online learning becomes more of a strategic resource for K-12 and higher-education institutions to supplement traditional courses, education leaders are starting to discuss how online learning can help support minority students’ instructional needs.”